Ensorcell

pies_ensorcell.jpg

ensorcell

  1. to bewitch: The beauty of the moon ensorcelled them.

This was it. This was the big day and things were definitely going to be different than last year.

As he stared in the mirror, tightening his butter yellow bow tie, Lee Purnell gave himself the stern, confident look he had been practicing. He wanted to make sure everyone knew he took his role seriously. He could not be bought or manipulated, as some had begun to fear.

In all honesty, he could understand their concerns.

The aroma of Cady Perler’s fresh homemade pies seemed to have the power to ensorcell any Hanover County Fair judge and make Leah Mayweather as green as a ripe cucumber.

Year after year, Cady presented her pies with a wink and a smile. And she left the fair with the huge coveted ribbon in her petite sugar-scented hands.

To hear the old fair veterans tell it, competition was thick this year. But the rumors were thicker.

One year it was rumored that Cady had paid judges to win the blue ribbon. It was also rumored that Leah had started that rumor. Strangely enough that was the same year Farmer Canton’s prize pig went missing. In the small town of Hanover that qualified as the biggest scandal in the history of the fair.

To prevent the sheer breakdown of the integrity of their Fair and way of life, Lee Purnell had been chosen to head the Fair’s board of volunteers. He was the youngest ever to take the role, which he promptly placed at the top of his resume. Although there were some naysayers–mainly from 89-year-old Grandmother Mayweather, who said such a thing would have never happened in her day–Lee believed he was the right man to prevent any further disturbances or negative press from appearing in the Hanover Weekly News.

“I am ready for this,” he told his reflection.”I was born for this.”

He check his phone for the time. The Fair would officially begin in an hour; it was time to leave.

“Mom!” Lee raced downstairs. “We have to hurry, if we’re going to make it on time.”

Mrs. Purnell, who was notorious for her public displays of disdain for the annual Fair, rolled her eyes wearily, knowing that both she and her son would be excited when he received his license and could drive himself to the Fair every year.

 

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